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Waiting

Is it time yet, God?

 
 
Hi, friends!
 
So I was scrolling down my Facebook newsfeed, and a meme caught my eye. I shared it on my author page because it resonated with me at the time. Thing is: I haven’t been able to get it out of my mind.
 
Here it is:
 
timepicforpost
 
Let that sink in.
 
We hear that God is never late. I believe it 100%.
 
But I’ve never considered that “God is never early.” That’s the part that has stuck with me.
 
I picture a timeline. If one point marks early and another point marks late, then there has to be a certain point on the timeline that is…
 

  • Right
  • Perfect
  • Exact
  • Precise
  • Dead-on

 
Think about the birth of Christ. Jesus didn’t come early to Earth. Neither did He come late. He came at the precise time. In the fullness of time.
 

 
But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son. (Galatians 4:4)
 

 
When everything was as God wanted, Jesus made His entrance onto the stage called Earth. Nothing and no one could rush his birth. Nothing and no one could stop it from happening. Everything was as it should have been for His supernatural entrance.
 
 
Same with His death and resurrection.
 

 
He gave himself to pay for the sins of everyone. That was a witness given by God at just the right time. (1 Timothy 2:6).
 
You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly. (Romans 5:6)
 

 
And with the death of Lazarus (John 11:1-44). Although Jesus knew about Lazarus’ illness, He waited a while before visiting him. By the time Jesus arrived, Lazarus had been dead four days! Both of Lazarus’ sisters told him, “I wish you had been here! Then my brother would not have died.” Jesus replied, “Lazarus is dead. For your benefit, I am glad I was not there. Now you will believe.”
 
 
Friends, I’m going to be transparent here: I have several things I think God is late on in my life. But after seeing this meme, I wonder whether it’s still early for Him to shine. Is it still too early that we’ll think we figured things out on our own?
 
 
TimeYetGod
 
 
I feel like time is running out. But I know He is never late.
 
And now I know, He’s never early. He is on-time. Precise. Exact. Perfect.
 

 
The suffering won’t last forever. It won’t be long before this generous God who has great plans for us in Christ – eternal and glorious plans they are! – will have you put together and on your feet for good. (1 Peter 5:10)
 
Our suffering is light and temporary and is producing for us an eternal glory that is greater than anything we can imagine. (2 Corinthians 4:17)
 
A thousand years to you are like one day; they are like yesterday, already gone, like a short hour in the night. (Psalm 90:4 2 Peter 3:8)
 

 
So … I wait. We wait. With hope and prayer and, many times, wavering faith.
 
And just when I think time is up…
 
 
 
Come alongside… Do you agree with God never being early? Why or why not? What are you waiting for? Does it feel like time is running out? How can you choose to believe that God will be on time? Please share with us in the box that says, “Leave a reply.” Remember you can reply anonymously.
 
 
 

Book Review: Still Looking by Vicki Huffman

Still_Looking_Book_Review_img

Click to Purchase on Amazon. (Note: This is an affiliate link.)

 
When I first submitted my family’s unemployment story to Vicki Huffman, I offered to write a review of her book once it was completed. Only God knew the reason and the season in which I would need to read the inspirational words in Still Looking: Finding the Peace of God in Job Loss.
 
 
When I received Vicki’s book to review several months later, my husband had been once again laid off for no fault of his own. Already, four weeks had passed since the day he showed up for work at his industrial construction job on a Monday morning and everyone had been let go. We were just starting to go through the familiar emotional, practical, and even spiritual fallouts of losing a job when I received the book. As I read through her family’s struggles with job loss—eight in all, I kept tapping the pages of my electronic book reader, saying:
 

“Yes! That’s exactly how I feel. That’s exactly how my husband is responding.”


 
 
Vicki was able to tap into those feelings not only from her own family’s experiences but also by citing renowned psychologists, experts, and everyday people who had the dubious honor of being unemployed at one time or another. She compared unemployment and job loss to the stages of grief and how those who are unemployed—for whatever reason—face similar feelings as those who have experienced loss of any kind—health death, divorce, to name a few. Vicki walks readers through the stages of grief, helping them to see the connections with job loss and how they eventually can move forward with the help of God.
 
 
As I read Still Looking, I began to see stages of grief in my own life—but for different reasons. Last year, I resigned from my corporate job at a Fortune 500 company to become a stay-at-home mom of our three children whom we adopted. Although a joyous occasion for my husband and me—and for our children, I felt the loss of fellowship with coworkers, usefulness and productivity that come from completing projects, and the accolades that accompany great work. I was able to see and work through these issues by reading Vicki’s book. She also helped me to understand the pros and cons of women working outside or inside the home, depending on their circumstances.
 
 

In addition to the emotional issues accompanying unemployment, Vicki offered practical and spiritual insight for times of job loss. She gave tips on how spouses can help and affirm each other during unemployment. As I re-read our own stories that we submitted to Vicki, it reminded me of the many ways my husband and I have supported each other during these times and how we can continue to do so.
 
 
Still Looking is filled with practical and spiritual insight on how to spend time during job loss, as well as other considerations that accompany unemployment, such as the possibilities of relocating and self-employment. Vicki also offers a unique perspective for those who are older and find themselves unemployed.
 
 
I especially liked the “P.S.—Post Job Script” sections that summarized each chapter and provided practical tips on how to move forward in recovery from unemployment. The “Peace to You” sections encouraged me with biblical passages and reminders of the peace of God when money is tight.
 
 
Oftentimes, books on difficult subjects tend to provide trite answers. Not so with Still Looking. It is fresh and original; Vicki Huffman has been there and she gets it.
 
 
From beginning to end, Vicki shows the joys of growing closer to God during times of financial strain. She is a great example of finding true peace during unemployment.
 
 
If I had one critique, it would be this: I would have liked for the book to include a set of study questions, whether at the end of each chapter or at the end of the book. That way, readers could work through the issues in each chapter more readily.
 
 
Regardless, I highly recommend Vicki Huffman’s Still Looking: Finding the Peace of God in Job Loss. It is a great tool to help readers through the valleys of unemployment—not once, but as in our case, several times. Still Looking is ideal for anyone who has a job and feels like it may be time to move on to another job or season in life, or they sense that unemployment might be imminent. It is a great resource for Bible study groups; readers can use it by themselves, with a mentor or counselor, or in a small group format. People in recovery groups also could benefit from it. The book also would be a great gift for someone working through issues of financial struggle.
 
 
Still Looking: Finding the Peace of God in Job Loss is available on Amazon (affiliate link).
 
 
Be blessed!
 
 
Come alongside… Have you experienced job loss? How have you dealt with it? Share in the comments below.
 
 

Taking Time to Rest

You might know from my life story that I struggle with several chronic illnesses. You probably wouldn’t know it just from looking at me, though.

 

Like any struggle, some days are better than others. Some weeks are better than others. And maybe, if we’re fortunate, some years are better than others.

 

Lately, it hasn’t been as good for me. And I’ve been struggling keeping up with my writing goals.

 

I’m letting you know so that you will, first and foremost, pray for me, but also understand if you don’t hear from me as regularly.

 

I’m taking some time to rest.

 

You might struggle with chronic issues too.

 

  • Physical illness.
  • Depression.
  • Addictions.
  • Fill-in-the-blank.

 

We probably wouldn’t know it just from looking at you either. Some days might be better for you than others. And the same goes for weeks and years.

 

If it’s been good for you lately, I rejoice with you! And I encourage you to share with others who might be struggling in similar ways.

 

If it has not been as good for you lately, please let me know–I want to pray for you. I hope you, too, will take some time to rest, refresh, and re-energize—not with anything that comes from within you but from God Himself.

 

He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak. (Isaiah 40:29)

 

 

I’ll refresh tired bodies; I’ll restore tired souls. (Jeremiah 31:25)

 

 

Come to me, all of you who are tired and have heavy loads, and I will give you rest. (Matthew 11:28)

 

 

Remember, there is a season for everything (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8). I have had my good seasons, and they have lasted a long while. I’m so grateful. I’ve entered a not-so-good season, and I’m not sure how long it will last. But I do know one thing: I will be in a good season again.

 

Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him. (Psalm 62:5)

 

 

Time to rest. I’ll be back soon.

 

Come alongside… What do you struggle with? What season is it for you? (Remember, you can comment anonymously.)

 

 

New Article Published Out of Scotland: “In the Fullness of Time”

Imagine my excitement to hear from a magazine editor in Scotland!

 

Judith Keefe contacted me after reading one of my other publications and requested that I write a story about my adoption journey so far. Of course, I agreed.

 

Judith has since published my article, “In the Fullness of Time,” at her magazine, Under the Rainbow

 

Here is a little more about Under the Rainbow–from their website:

UtR is a collaborative Christian resource launched in Glasgow in 2011 to support parents who have lost children particularly before or soon after birth.  The main aim of UtR is to encourage people in their walk with God. Through Biblical resources, people’s personal stories and other information, it is hoped people will be upheld and comforted and glory and honour will be brought to God.

 

The resource is developing to also include support and information on fostering and adoption.

 

Judith Keefe initiated and developed UtR with support from many people who have directly experienced loss or want to support the work.   Through her and her husband’s own experiences of miscarriage over a number of years and travelling the road of grieving with a friend after her baby son died, God brought about the desire to see a Biblical, God honouring resource available to those grieving.

 

I am so honored to have this ministry reach people not only in the United States but also throughout the world.

 

I hope you will read “In the Fullness of Time” and share Under the Rainbow with your family and friends.

 

Big hugs,
Daphne

New Article: “In the Fullness of Time…”

Awhile back, I mentioned that Mentoring Moments for Christian Women invited me to become one of their staff writers.

 

 

“In the Fullness of Time” is my most recent publication at MMCW.

 

I hope you will read, comment, and share.

 

And if you haven’t already subscribed to Mentoring Moments, I encourage you to do so.

 

Big hugs,
Daphne

Affiliate Disclosure

Daphne Tarango is a participant in affiliate programs with Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, DaySpring, Church Source, Hazelden, Christian Strong (via Conversant and ShareASale). These advertising services are designed to provide a means for sites like DaphneWrites.com to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to said merchants. Some images and articles may contain links to products on merchant sites. Should you choose to make purchases through those links, please understand that I will receive a small commission. Please do not feel like you need to use these links to make any purchases. The links are only for your convenience. Thank you.

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